Sunday, July 17, 2011

July 23, Jim Ovelmen

Homemade Holograms: Two Clocks
Halsey Rodman and Ohad Meromi
Curated by Jim Ovelmen










Homemade Holograms: Two Clocks

Halsey Rodman and Ohad Meromi
video installation

CURATOR’S STATEMENT

by Jim Ovelmen
"Homemade Holograms: Two Clocks"
Halsey Rodman and Ohad Meromi
video installation
P Ø ST, July 23rd, 2011

Halsey Rodman and Ohad Meromi are New York artists with exhibitions histories integrating sculpture into various media. Do-it-yourself aesthetic investigations into the sculptural real and the video virtual may not seem like virgin territory these days, but what both Rodman and Meromi do in the work involves a remarkable restaging of time and volume.

Rodman’s work is over 3 hours long. Meroni’s work is only 10 seconds —looped endlessly. In Rodman’s video, we see him lying for hours at the center of a large table in his studio. In order to create a self-portrait, he had 12 participants flock around and construct a sculptural version him. This event, called The Navigator, was filmed over two periods separated by exactly one year. The series was connected to a sculptural project commissioned by the Saatchi Gallery in 2006. Rodman’s 3 hour and 22 minute video gives the impossibility of perceiving the whole although we are looking right at it. The same inability that we have of understanding time is paired visually to this paradox.

Ohad Meromi 2009 work Specter II shows a peculiar revolving object. Meromi integrates sculpture and installations into something like spacial maps of familiar forms, domestic and architectural —as if those terms are separated all too often.

Using stop motion animation, Meromi creates something that can easily be mistaken as computer generated animation. The sense of scale as well is left ambiguous, as the artist has not included the original dimensions here. Specter II loops endlessly because the last frame of the animation is identical to the first frame.

In January of 2011, I co-curated a show called "Universe City" that projected video art onto campus buildings of CSULA. Rodman and Meromi were included in this show, and the two videos that are presented here tonight were featured. In that show, these videos The Navigator and Specter II were projected three stories tall on a campus-building facade. (see images). These works continue to deliver a surprising lesson, to different extremes, on how an artwork exists in any specific time and dimension —while reminding us of the incapability of demonstrating this.

Jim Ovelmen

July 22, 2011